Selling Your Home And Living In The Past

If it’s been awhile since you’ve sold a home, I have news for you.  Things are a little different nowadays.

For one thing, there is this really cool thing called The Internet. It’s amazing. It links people together and it provides massive amounts of information in almost real time. I mean, you can see how much a house is being sold for, pictures of the house inside and out, what kind of features it has. All kinds of neat and groovy stuff that you couldn’t access the last time you sold your house.

For another thing, there are these neat little things called lock boxes. Man, are they cool.

They’re electronically controlled so lots of Realtors can access them to show your house to their clients. They’re safeguarded with individualized key cards with individual PIN numbers so you know who is accessing them. So, it’s not like any Tom, Dick or Harry can get into your house. What it does mean is that they don’t have to wait for a Sunday afternoon Open House to see what your house really looks like compared to all the others they’re looking at.

All this is to say that between this Internet thing and electronic lock boxes and, oh yeah, the Multiple Listing Service, you can pretty much count on your house being shown to interested buyer-types and sold assuming it’s priced competitively, it’s in good condition and it’s in a location people want to live in.

Realtor “Caravans”

CaravanThis leads me to an a short conversation I had awhile back with a seller client.

We were discussing the “best day” to put the house on the market. My take way that any day that ended in “y” would be a good day.  Some people may think Thursday or Friday are good because they’re close to the weekend. Whatever.

This particular person was asking about Tuesday because, “Isn’t that the day all you Realtors go on caravan?’

O…M…G

I haven’t heard of Realtor caravans in years. Years.

The concept was that, after their weekly Tuesday morning meetings where they would fill up on donuts and coffee, an office of Realtors would all hop in their cars and form a “caravan” to visit listings that were on the market. They’d spend 2 or 3 hours driving around and looking at houses. Maybe they would break for lunch or an early Happy Hour.

Sounds like tons of fun, huh?

News flash. Between being able to view (or preview) houses virtually anytime as a result of the above mentioned lock boxes and being able to view photos of the house on The Internet makes that whole caravan thing so mid-twentieth century.

Open Houses, Brochures, Real Estate Ad Magazines And More

Yeah. Back in the day, a hard working Realtor had to do lots of stuff to get the word out that 123 Main Street was up for sale. Now, I can set up an automatic e-mail feed to my buyer clients using the exact criteria they want. As soon as a new home comes on the market that matches their criteria….BOOM! It hits there InBox saying, “Look at me!”.

Still, there are lots of home owners out there that insists on brochures that are sitting on the kitchen counter or attached to the yard sign out front because, well, someone who’s seen the house may need a little memory jogger about the house they’ve seen and it’s more convenient that looking at it online (really!).

Take my word for it, Realtors are busting their little tushies to make sure the world knows about your house. The MLS, social media, single property websites and an entire array of public facing real estate-centric websites that show that your house is on the market are just some of the ways.

So.

Don’t worry about trying to “help” your Realtor with suggestions about they way things were in 1982. Things have changed.  You have plenty of other stuff to worry about. Trust me on this one.

Here’s something from 1983 you can groove to….

About Ken Montville

Ken Montville is a Realtor® and Associate Broker with RE/MAX United Real Estate in the beautiful Maryland Suburbs of Washington, DC. He has been selling nice homes since 1999. Way back in the 20th Century.

When Ken Is not doing the real estate thing he can be found all over social media in places too numerous to mention and he listens to jazz, reads a little (mostly non-fiction), hangs out with the Rotary Club of College Park, MD and can be found blogging at MDSuburbanHomes.com

  • These days, your first “open-house” happens when a home shopper pulls up your house on their iPad while watching (pick a show) on TV. If the photos are good, they may say… “honey, check this house out” and that’s when the iPad gets handed over to the other couch.

    A few swipes later (pause) and a decision is made if your house is worth the trip!

    Internet addicted home shoppers likely have a couple of apps sending them alerts 24/7. So, don’t blow your online open-house with sub-par photos.

    • Preach it, Brother Doug! That will become even more common as the Millennials become the driving force in the housing market.